Love Thy Nature film demonstrates how we can connect with the power and beauty of the natural world.

Love Thy Nature opens with a quote from Rumi, “Let the beauty of what you love be what you do. There are a thousand ways to kneel and kiss the Earth.” This documentary reminds you of just how precious nature is through incredible HD cinematography of nature, accompanied by fascinating connections drawn by a variety of experts, including LA-based yoga instructor Julian Walker. The rare footage of scenes of the seas, mountains, cities, and exotic animals are breathtaking.

The film is gorgeously directed by documentarian and yogini Sylvie Rokab who says, “I found that not very many people felt connected to nature and their lifestyles were disconnected. I had a passion to express this artistically; the beauty and power of being connected to nature.”

Liam Neeson narrates as the voice of Homo Sapiens, with the perspective of a 200,000-year-old relationship with nature. This film poses the following question through his storytelling: What do we do about our connection to the natural world in our increasingly modernized society? The answer: Nature is definitely worth communing with and preserving, and the film suggests simple ways to honor the Earth at the end.

The film graphically demonstrates that if earth’s 4.5-billion-year lifespan were reduced to one year, humans have existed for only the final 23 minutes while 200 years of industrial revolution represent just the last second.

Sylvie has observed, “Loving ourselves is a yogic way of seeing the world. We experience mindfulness of everything, to be connected to nature and by connecting with nature we connect with ourselves. We become more aware and in touch.”

Love Thy Nature opens in Los Angeles on May 6 before a nationwide screening series in partnership with The Sierra Club and other organizations.
Directed by Sylvie Rokab
In the Light Productions

Karen Henry is an Associate Editor at LA YOGA who volunteers in a variety of capacities for nonprofit organizations and artists around Los Angeles. She practices yoga as a counterbalance to her daily impact sports and is a mother of four grown children who also practice yoga (well, the two in California at least).